Bible Versions

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Two traditions...

Septuagint, Jews who deny Jesus had no authority, removed books from scripture, hiding Jesus as Christ.

Masoretic, "The Jews say it was done wisely in deliberation, so Ptolemy, the worshipper of one god, might not yet discover a double divinity with the Hebrews; he made them (do so) chiefly for this reason, because he was seen to fall into the dogma of Plato. Accordingly, wherever anything sacred in Scripture is witnessed of the Father and Son and Holy Spirit, they are either translated otherwise, or they have passed over all in silence, so they might both satisfy the king, and might not divulge the secret of the Faith."

Masoretic Text variances

In the following, modern Protestant bible translation (which claim the Masoretic to be like the original Hebrew, and accepting its canon) still replace these verses with verses from the Septuagint or Latin Vulgate.

The wikipedia article for the King James Version notes:

For their Old Testament, the translators used a text originating in the editions of the Hebrew Rabbinic Bible by Daniel Bomberg (1524/5), but adjusted this to conform to the Greek LXX or Latin Vulgate in passages to which Christian tradition had attached a Christological interpretation.

For example, the Septuagint reading "They pierced my hands and my feet" was used in Psalm 22:16 (vs. the Masoretes' reading of the Hebrew "like lions my hands and feet"[133])

Matthew relies on the Septuagint for the assertion that the Messiah's mother was to be a virgin (Matthew 1.23).  Jesus himself follows the traditional Septuagint wording in condemning the Pharisees' traditions (Matthew 15.8-9).  The Septuagint clearly prophesies that Jesus will heal the blind (Luke 4.18-19) - but the Masoretic text is more obscure.  The Septuagint foretold that the Messiah's death would be unjust (Acts 8.32-33) and that the Gentiles would seek the Lord (Acts 15.16-17).  The Hebrew has the nations being "possessed" along with Edom.  Paul knows that a remnant of Israel will be saved because he was reading the Old Testament in Greek (Romans 9.27-28).  Perhaps if his topic were the return to the Holy Land and not salvation, he would have found the Hebrew reading more suitable.  Following the Greek, he knows that the Messiah will conquer his people's sin - not that he would come to those who had already cleansed themselves from sin, as the Hebrew would have it (Romans 11.26-27).  Paul's thought that Jesus would rule the Gentiles also depends on a Septuagint reading (Romans 15.12).  The author of the book of Hebrews - to prove the deity of Christ - proclaims the truth that Jesus is worshipped by all the angels of God (Hebrews 1.6).  But the Hebrew Old Testament does not contain that verse.  Also on the basis of the Greek Old Testament, that author asserts that the incarnation was prophecied (Hebrews 10.5-7) - that Jesus would have a body, which he would offer for our sanctification (Hebrews 10.10).  The Masoretic text at this point stresses auditory capability.  Finally, where the Masoretic text described a nonviolent suffering servant, the Septuagint prophesied a sinless Messiah (1 Peter 2.22)...

Masoretic readings are preferred by the New Testament authors when they reference Job, Zechariah and Malachi.  It is understandable, therefore, that Jerome, in his critiques of the Septuagint, emphasized passages from Hosea and Zechariah to support his contention that the New Testament authors diverged from the Septuagint whenever the Greek departed in meaning from the Hebrew. 

Although, as  noted above, the disagreement with the Septuagint is most pronounced in the synoptic gospels, these diverge from the Masoretic text even more strongly than they do from the Septuagint.  This is not at all what one would have expected from reading Jerome’s Lives of Illustrious Men.  “Matthew, also called Levi, apostle and aforetimes publican, composed a gospel of Christ at first published in Judea in Hebrew for the sake of those of the circumcision who believed, but this was afterwards translated into Greek though by what author is uncertain.  The Hebrew itself has been preserved until the present day in the library at Caesarea which Pamphilus so diligently gathered.  I have also had the opportunity of having this volume described to me by the Nazarenes of Borea, a city of Syria, who use it.  In this it is to be noted that wherever the Evangelist, whether on his own account or in the person of our Lord the Saviour quotes the testimony of the Old Testament he does not follow the authority of the translators of the Septuagint but the Hebrew.”  The reader can himself test the verity of this statement directly or by consulting Figure 3, which shows that even Matthew preferred the Septuagint to the Hebrew.

Jerome (Letter LVII), after reviewing passages such as those in Table 8 above, remarked:  “From all these passages it is clear that the apostles and evangelists in translating the old testament scriptures have sought to give the meaning rather than the words, and that they have not greatly cared to preserve forms or constructions, so long as they could make clear the subject to understanding.”

  And even if the Septuagint is thick with mistranslation, its errors are frequently sanctioned by the New Testament.  For instance, if the word “virgin (parthenos in Greek)” in Isaiah 7.14 is a mistranslation of the Hebrew word almah, Matthew has given his assent to this error.  In fact, those of us who believe the New Testament to be inspired by God are required to believe that many “errors” of the Septuagint are inspired also, because they are incorporated into the New Testament directly.  If the errors that are quoted have Divine sanction, on what basis can we reject the errors that are not quoted?  Or, consider what we imply if we say that the Masoretic text alone can lay claim to being the genuine Old Testament.  The clear implication is that the authors of the New Testament were benighted and, ignorant of the truth, used an inferior text.  The theological implications they drew when they quoted from “mistranslations” in the Septuagint should be rejected.  Thus, the logical corollaries to the proposition that the Masoretic text alone is worthy to be considered the Old Testament include:  Christ was not born of a virgin, the angels do not worship the Son, Christ did not come to restore sight to the blind, the behavior of the Jews was not cause for God’s name to be blasphemed among the Gentiles, etc.  In short, we are forced to conclude that the New Testament is not inspired. 

In short, neither the Greek nor the Hebrew Old Testament is perfect.  The decision to abandon the Septuagint in favor of the Hebrew was made on the mistaken belief that the New Testament quotes exclusively from the Hebrew Old Testament.  A more modern argument in favor of the Hebrew might stress the near-perfect preservation of that text through the centuries - a contention proven false by the variant readings discovered in the Dead Sea Scrolls - or it might emphasize the mistranslations in the only other real contender, the Septuagint - which implies the rejection of the authority of the New Testament.  The argument in favor of returning to the Septuagint notes the general (though not universal) reliance on it by the New Testament authors and their followers in the early Church.  The New Testament can be more fully understood and appreciated, it is argued, if read in conjunction with the Septuagint, because the language of the Greek Old Testament is present throughout the New, both in overt quotations and allusions.  The theology of the Church, as explained by the Fathers of the first several centuries, rests on the wording of the Septuagint.  If this theology is true and worthy of defense, then it is critical that the Church be thoroughly familiar with the Bible of Her founders and early defenders.

It seems clear to me that the case in favor of the Septuagint is the stronger of the two.  But the same primary argument in favor of translation from the Septuagint - New Testament precedent - implies that the Christian should be aware of Masoretic readings.  In like manner, our desire to understand the theology of the early Church in the light of Her scriptures entails the need to retain familiarity with those scriptures - such as the ones quoted by Justin Martyr above - which appear to have dropped out of the Old Testament over the years.  In my view, then, the ideal Old Testament will be based on the Septuagint as the primary source, and will include extensive footnotes including significant variant readings from all other sources, including the Masoretic text, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Samaritan Pentateuch, and the Fathers of the Church. 
- Source

Nt sides with Masoretic

The Hebrew Scriptures are used by apostolic men; they are used, as is evident, by the apostles and evangelists. Our Lord and Savior himself whenever he refers to the Scriptures, takes his quotations from the Hebrew; as in the instance of the words "He that believes in me, as the Scripture has said, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water," and in the words used on the cross itself, "Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani," which is by interpretation "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" not, as it is given by the Septuagint, "My God, my God, look upon me, why have you forsaken me?" and many similar cases. I do not say this in order to aim a blow at the seventy translators; but I assert that the Apostles of Christ have an authority superior to theirs. Wherever the Seventy agree with the Hebrew, the apostles took their quotations from that translation; but, where they disagree, they set down in Greek what they had found in the Hebrew. 
- Jerome, in his Apology Against Rufinus, Book II, Section 34


And especially by the authority of the Evangelists and the Apostles, in which we read many things from the Old Testament which are not found in our books, as it is (with): "Out of Egypt I have called My Son," [Matthew 2:15] and "For He shall be called a Nazarene," [Matthew 2:23] and "They will look on Him Whom they have pierced," [John 19:37] and "Rivers of living waters shall flow from his belly," [John 7:38] and "Things which no eye has seen, nor ear heard, nor has arisen in the heart of man, which God has prepared for those loving Him," [1 Corinthians 2:9] and many others which are desiring a proper context.

Therefore let us ask them where these are written, and when they are unable to say, we may produce them from the Hebrew books. The first witness is in Hosea, the second in Isaiah, the third in Zechariah, the fourth in Proverbs, the fifth is also in Isaiah, of which many are ignorant, the follies of apocrypha being followed, preferring Iberian dirges to authentic books.

The cause of the error is not for me to explain. The Jews say it was done wisely in deliberation, so Ptolemy, the worshipper of one god, might not yet discover a double divinity with the Hebrews; he made them (do so) chiefly for this reason, because he was seen to fall into the dogma of Plato. Accordingly, wherever anything sacred in Scripture is witnessed of the Father and Son and Holy Spirit, they are either translated otherwise, or they have passed over all in silence, so they might both satisfy the king, and might not divulge the secret of the Faith.

- Jerome, Prologue to Genesis

Spots where Jerome is right, and NT agrees with Masoretic over Septuagint:

  • Matt 11.10/ Malachi 3.1
  • John 19.37/ Zech. 12.10
  • Rom 9.33/ Isaiah 8.14
  • Rom 11.35/ Job 41.11
  • 1 Cor 3.19/ Job 5.13

Hosea 11:1

Hosea 11:1 (Masoretic Text)
When Israel was a child, I loved him, and out of Egypt I called my son.
Hosea 11:1 (Septuagint)
Early in the morning were they cast off, the king of Israel has been cast off: for Israel is a child, and I loved him, and out of Egypt have I called his children.
Matthew 2:15
This was to fulfill what the Lord had spoken by the prophet, "Out of Egypt I called my son."

Mentioned by Jerome in his Prologue to Genesis

Zechariah 12:10

Zechariah 12:10 (Masoretic Text)
And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and pleas for mercy, so that, when they look on me, on him whom they have pierced, they shall mourn for him, as one mourns for an only child, and weep bitterly over him, as one weeps over a firstborn.
Zechariah 12:10 (Septuagint)
And I will pour upon the house of David, and upon the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the spirit of grace and compassion: and they shall look upon me, because they have mocked [me], and they shall make lamentation for him, as for a beloved [friend], and they shall grieve intensely, as for a firstborn [son].
John 19:37
And again another Scripture says, "They will look on him whom they have pierced."

Mentioned by Jerome in his Prologue to Genesis

NT sides with Septuagint

And further, I give a challenge to my accuser. I have shown that many things are set down in the New Testament as coming from the older books, which are not to be found in the Septuagint; and I have pointed out that these exist in the Hebrew. Now let him show that there is anything in the New Testament which comes from the Septuagint but which is not found in the Hebrew, and our controversy is at an end.
- Jerome, in his Apology Against Rufinus, Book II, Section 34

Isaiah 7:14 (virgin birth prophecy)

Isaiah 7:14 (Masoretic Text)
Therefore the Lord Himself shall give you a sign: behold, a young woman (hā-‘al-māh) shall conceive and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel
Isaiah 7:14 (Septuagint)
Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; behold, a virgin (parthenos) shall conceive in the womb, and shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call his name Emmanuel. 
Matthew 1:22-23
All this took place to fulfill what the Lord had spoken by the prophet: "Behold, the virgin (parthenos) shall conceive and bear a son, and they shall call his name Immanuel"
~160 AD: Justin Martyr in his Dialogue with Trypho, Chapter 71
    But I am far from putting reliance in your teachers, who refuse to admit that the interpretation made by the seventy elders [the Septuagint] who were with Ptolemy [king] of the Egyptians is a correct one; and they attempt to frame another. And I wish you to observe, that they have altogether taken away many Scriptures from the translations effected by those seventy elders who were with Ptolemy, and by which this very man who was crucified is proved to have been set forth expressly as God, and man, and as being crucified, and as dying; but since I am aware that this is denied by all of your nation, I do not address myself to these points, but I proceed to carry on my discussions by means of those passages which are still admitted by you. For you assent to those which I have brought before your attention, except that you contradict the statement, 'Behold, the virgin shall conceive,' and say it ought to be read, 'Behold, the young woman shall conceive.' And I promised to prove that the prophecy referred, not, as you were taught, to Hezekiah, but to this Christ of mine: and now I shall go to the proof...

Psalm 8:2 (ordained praise)

Psalm 8:2 (Masoretic Text)
Out of the mouth of babies and infants you have ordained strength, because of your enemies, that you might still the enemy and the avenger.
Psalm 8:2 (Septuagint)
Out of the mouth of babies and infants you have ordained praise, because of your enemies, that you might still the enemy and the avenger.
Matthew 21:16
And Jesus said to them, "Yes; have you never read, 'Out of the mouth of babies and infants have you ordained praise'?"

Proverbs 11:31 (scarcely saved)

Proverbs 11:31 (Masoretic Text)
If the righteous is repaid on earth, how much more the wicked and the sinner!
Proverbs 11:31 (Septuagint)
If the righteous is scarcely saved, what will become of the ungodly and the sinner?
1 Peter 4:18
And "If the righteous is scarcely saved, what will become of the ungodly and the sinner?"

Genesis 47:31 (staff vs. bed)

Genesis 47:31 (Masoretic Text)
And he said, "Swear to me"; and he swore to him. Then Israel bowed himself upon the head of his bed.
Genesis 47:31 (Septuagint)
And he said, "Swear to me"; and he swore to him. Then Israel bowed himself upon the head of his staff.
Hebrews 11:21
By faith Jacob, when dying, blessed each of the sons of Joseph, bowing in worship over the head of his staff.

Psalm 40:6-8 (body vs. open ear)

Psalm 40:6-8 (Masoretic Text)
In sacrifice and offering you have not delighted, but you have given me an open ear. Burnt offering and sin offering you have not required. Then I said, “Behold, I have come; in the scroll of the book it is written of me: I delight to do your will, O my God; your law is within my heart."
Psalm 40:6-8 (Septuagint, numbered Psalm 39 rather than 40)
In sacrifice and offering you have not delighted, but a body have you prepared for me. Burnt offering and sin offering you have not required. Then I said, “Behold, I have come; in the scroll of the book it is written of me: I delight to do your will, O my God; your law is within my heart."
Hebrews 10:5-7
Consequently, when Christ came into the world, he said, "Sacrifices and offerings you have not desired, but a body have you prepared for me; in burnt offerings and sin offerings you have taken no pleasure. Then I said, 'Behold, I have come to do your will, O God, as it is written of me in the scroll of the book.'"

Habakkuk 1:5 (scoffers)

Habakkuk 1:5 (Masoretic Text)
Look among the nations, and see; wonder and be astounded. For I am doing a work in your days that you would not believe if told.
Habakkuk 1:5 (Septuagint)
Look, you scoffers, and look and be astounded and perish; for I am doing a work in your days, a work that you will not believe, even if one tells it to you.
Acts 13:41
'Look, you scoffers, be astounded and perish; for I am doing a work in your days, a work that you will not believe, even if one tells it to you.'

Amos 5:25-27 (Moloch and Rephan)

Amos 5:25-27 (Masoretic Text)
 "Did you bring to me sacrifices and offerings during the forty years in the wilderness, O house of Israel? You shall take up Sikkuth your king, and Kiyyun your star-god, your images that you made for yourselves, and I will send you into exile beyond Damascus," says the Lord, whose name is the God of hosts.
Amos 5:25-27 (Septuagint)
 "Did you bring to me sacrifices and offerings, O house of Israel, during the forty years in the wilderness? You took up the tent of Moloch and the star of your god Rephan, the images that you made for yourselves. And I will send you into exile beyond Damascus," says the Lord, the Almighty God is his name.
Acts 7:42-43
But God turned away and gave them over to worship the host of heaven, as it is written in the book of the prophets: 'Did you bring to me slain beasts and sacrifices, during the forty years in the wilderness, O house of Israel? You took up the tent of Moloch and the star of your god Rephan, the images that you made to worship; and I will send you into exile beyond Babylon.'

Isaiah 53:7-8 (humiliation)

Isaiah 53:7-8 (Masoretic Text)
He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth; like a lamb that is led to the slaughter, and like a sheep that before its shearers is silent, so he opened not his mouth. By oppression and judgment he was taken away; and as for his generation, who considered that he was cut off out of the land of the living, stricken for the transgression of my people?
Isaiah 53:7-8 (Septuagint)
 And he, because of his affliction, opens not his mouth; like a sheep he was led to the slaughter and like a lamb before its shearer is silent, so he opens not his mouth. In his humiliation justice was denied him. Who can describe his generation? For his life is taken away from the earth; because of the iniquities of my people he was led to death. 
Acts 8:32-33
Now the passage of the Scripture that he was reading was this: "Like a sheep he was led to the slaughter and like a lamb before its shearer is silent, so he opens not his mouth. In his humiliation justice was denied him. Who can describe his generation? For his life is taken away from the earth."

Proverbs 3:34 (proud and humble)

Proverbs 3:34 (Masoretic Text)
Toward the scorners he is scornful, but to the humble he gives favor.
Proverbs 3:34 (Septuagint)
The Lord opposes the proud but he gives grace to the humble.
James 4:6
But he gives more grace. Therefore it says, "God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble."

Isaiah 42:4 (hope)

Isaiah 42:3-4 (Masoretic Text)
A bruised reed he will not break, and a faintly burning wick he will not quench; he will faithfully bring forth justice. He will not grow faint or be discouraged till he has established justice in the earth; and the coastlands wait for his law.
Isaiah 42:3-4 (Septuagint)
A bruised reed he will not break, and a smoking wick he will not quench; but he shall bring forth judgement to truth. He shall shine out, and shall not be discouraged, until he has established judgement on the earth: and in his name the Gentiles will hope.
Matthew 12:17-21
This was to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah: "[...] a bruised reed he will not break, and a smoldering wick he will not quench, until he brings justice to victory; and in his name the Gentiles will hope."

Deuteronomy 32:43 (missing)

Deuteronomy 32:43 (Masoretic Text)
Rejoice his people, O nations; for he avenges the blood of his servants and takes vengeance on his adversaries and cleanses his people's land.
Deuteronomy 32:43 (Septuagint)
Rejoice, ye heavens, with him, and let all the angels of God worship him; rejoice ye Gentiles, with his people, and let all the sons of God strengthen themselves in him; for he will avenge the blood of his sons, and he will render vengeance, and recompense justice to his enemies, and will reward them that hate him; and the Lord shall purge the land of his people.
Hebrews 1:6
And again, when he brings the firstborn into the world, he says, "Let all God's angels worship him."

Isaiah 40:3-5 (salvation of God)

Isaiah 40:3-5 (Masoretic Text)
A voice cries: "In the wilderness prepare the way of the Lord; make straight in the desert a highway for our God. Every valley shall be lifted up, and every mountain and hill be made low; the uneven ground shall become level, and the rough places a plain. And the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together, for the mouth of the Lord has spoken."
Isaiah 40:3-5 (Septuagint)
The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight the paths of our God. Every valley shall be filled, and every mountain and hill shall be brought low: and all the crooked [ways] shall become straight, and the rough [places] plains. And the glory of the Lord shall appear, and all flesh shall see the salvation of God: for the Lord has spoken [it].
Luke 3:4-6
As it is written in the book of the words of Isaiah the prophet, "The voice of one crying in the wilderness: 'Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. Every valley shall be filled, and every mountain and hill shall be made low, and the crooked shall become straight, and the rough places shall become level ways, and all flesh shall see the salvation of God.'"

Isaiah 53:9 (sinless Messiah)

Isaiah 53:9 (Masoretic Text)
And they made his grave with the wicked and with a rich man in his death, although he had done no violence, and there was no deceit in his mouth.
Isaiah 53:9 (Septuagint)
And I will give the wicked for his burial, and the rich for his death; for he committed no sin, neither was deceit found in his mouth.
1 Peter 2:21-22
For to this you have been called, because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, so that you might follow in his steps. He committed no sin, neither was deceit found in his mouth.

Specific Versions

KJV

The translators appear to have otherwise made no first-hand study of ancient manuscript sources, even those that – like the Codex Bezae – would have been readily available to them...

For their New Testament, the translators chiefly used the 1598 and 1588/89 Greek editions of Theodore Beza...

For their Old Testament, the translators used a text originating in the editions of the Hebrew Rabbinic Bible by Daniel Bomberg (1524/5),[131] but adjusted this to conform to the Greek LXX or Latin Vulgate in passages to which Christian tradition had attached a Christological interpretation...

- Quoted from here

Rheims and Douay Version

Cardinal Newman, in The History of the Text of the Rheims and Douay Version of Holy Scripture

Specific verses

Unicorns

The King James version contains several mistranslations; especially in the Old Testament where the knowledge of Hebrew and cognate languages was uncertain at the time. Most of these are minor and do not significantly change the meaning compared to the source material. Among the most commonly cited errors is in the Hebrew of Job and Deuteronomy, where רֶאֵם "Re'em" with the probable meaning of "wild-ox, aurochs", is translated in the KJV as "unicorn"; following in this the Vulgate unicornis and several medieval rabbinic commentators. The translators of the KJV note the alternative rendering, "rhinocerots" [sic] in the margin at Isaiah 34:7. On a similar note Martin Luther's German translation had also relied on the Vulgate Latin on this point, consistently translating רֶאֵם using the German word for unicorn, "Einhorn."
- Quoted from here


Some scriptures quoted in the New Testament have no corresponding Old Testament passage

Indeed, there are also many things quoted as scripture in the New Testament that don't appear in the Old Testament at all. Early church fathers believed the Jews of their day who denied Christ had deleted things from scriptures, and these quotations from the New Testament (with no corresponding Old Testament passage) seem to support that.

James 4:5
Or do you suppose it is to no purpose that the Scripture says, "He yearns jealously over the spirit that he has made to dwell in us"?
John 7:38
Whoever believes in me, as the Scripture has said, 'Out of his heart will flow rivers of living water.'
Matthew 2:23
And he went and lived in a city called Nazareth, so that what was spoken by the prophets might be fulfilled, that he would be called a Nazarene.
1 Corinthians 15:45
Thus it is written, "The first man Adam became a living being"; the last Adam became a life-giving spirit.
Luke 24:46
As they were talking about these things, Jesus himself stood among them, and said to them, "Peace to you!" [...] Then he said to them, "These are my words that I spoke to you while I was still with you, that everything written about me in the Law of Moses and the Prophets and the Psalms must be fulfilled." Then he opened their minds to understand the Scriptures, and said to them, "Thus it is written, that the Christ should suffer and on the third day rise from the dead, and that repentance for the forgiveness of sins should be proclaimed in his name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem. [...]"

- Some claim this is a vague allusion to Hosea 6:2, which says "After two days he will revive us; on the third day he will raise us up, that we may live before him."
Mark 9:12
And he said to them, "Elijah does come first to restore all things. And how is it written of the Son of Man that he should suffer many things and be treated with contempt?"

- Some say this is a vague allusion to Isaiah 53
1 Corinthians 2:9
But, as it is written, "What no eye has seen, nor ear heard, nor the heart of man imagined, what God has prepared for those who love him"

- Origen (~240 AD) says the quote comes from the Apocalypse of Elias in his Commentary on Matthew 27:9
- Jerome (~390 AD) found the words in the Ascension of Isaiah and the Apocalypse of Elias
- Some say this is a paraphrase of Isaiah 64:4, which says "From of old no one has heard or perceived by the ear, no eye has seen a God besides you, who acts for those who wait for him." The words are similar, though the concept is different.
Hebrews 11:37
They were stoned, they were sawn in two, they were killed with the sword. They went about in skins of sheep and goats, destitute, afflicted, mistreated...

- There's no reference in the Old Testament to a good man being sawn in two.
- An ancient tradition, mentioned both by Jewish and by early Christian writers, relates that Isaiah was thus put to death by order of Manasseh.

~160 AD: Justin Martyr in his Dialogue with Trypho, Chapter 120
But since what follows indicates that the reference is to Christ (for it is, 'and He shall be the expectation of nations'), I do not proceed to have a mere verbal controversy with you, as I have not attempted to establish proof about Christ from the passages of Scripture which are not admitted by you which I quoted from the words of Jeremiah the prophet, and Esdras, and David; but from those which are even now admitted by you, which had your teachers comprehended, be well assured they would have deleted them, as they did those about the death of Isaiah, whom you sawed asunder with a wooden saw.
~160 AD: Justin Martyr in his Dialogue with Trypho, Chapter 72
    Justin: I shall do as you please. From the statements, then, which Esdras made in reference to the law of the passover, they have taken away the following: 'And Esdras said to the people, This passover is our Savior and our refuge. And if you have understood, and your heart has taken it in, that we shall humble Him on a standard, and thereafter hope in Him, then this place shall not be forsaken for ever, says the God of hosts. But if you will not believe Him, and will not listen to His declaration, you shall be a laughing-stock to the nations.' And from the sayings of Jeremiah they have cut out the following: 'I [was] like a lamb that is brought to the slaughter: they devised a device against me, saying, Come, let us lay on wood on His bread, and let us blot Him out from the land of the living; and His name shall no more be remembered.' [Jeremiah 11:19] And since this passage from the sayings of Jeremiah is still written in some copies [of the Scriptures] in the synagogues of the Jews (for it is only a short time since they were cut out), and since from these words it is demonstrated that the Jews deliberated about the Christ Himself, to crucify and put Him to death, He Himself is both declared to be led as a sheep to the slaughter, as was predicted by Isaiah, and is here represented as a harmless lamb; but being in a difficulty about them, they give themselves over to blasphemy. And again, from the sayings of the same Jeremiah these have been cut out: 'The Lord God remembered His dead people of Israel who lay in the graves; and He descended to preach to them His own salvation.'
~160 AD: Justin Martyr in his Dialogue with Trypho, Chapter 71
    But I am far from putting reliance in your teachers, who refuse to admit that the interpretation made by the seventy elders who were with Ptolemy [king] of the Egyptians is a correct one; and they attempt to frame another. And I wish you to observe, that they have altogether taken away many Scriptures from the translations effected by those seventy elders who were with Ptolemy, and by which this very man who was crucified is proved to have been set forth expressly as God, and man, and as being crucified, and as dying; but since I am aware that this is denied by all of your nation, I do not address myself to these points, but I proceed to carry on my discussions by means of those passages which are still admitted by you. For you assent to those which I have brought before your attention, except that you contradict the statement, 'Behold, the virgin shall conceive,' and say it ought to be read, 'Behold, the young woman shall conceive.' And I promised to prove that the prophecy referred, not, as you were taught, to Hezekiah, but to this Christ of mine: and now I shall go to the proof...
~240 AD: Origen in his Letter to Africanus
    In answer to this, I have to tell you what it behooves us to do in the cases not only of the History of Susanna, which is found in every Church of Christ in that Greek copy which the Greeks use, but is not in the Hebrew, or of the two other passages you mention at the end of the book containing the history of Bel and the Dragon, which likewise are not in the Hebrew copy of Daniel; but of thousands of other passages also which I found in many places when with my little strength I was collating the Hebrew copies with ours. [...]
    And I make it my endeavor not to be ignorant of their various readings, lest in my controversies with the Jews I should quote to them what is not found in their copies, and that I may make some use of what is found there, even although it should not be in our Scriptures. [...]
    Wherefore I think no other supposition is possible, than that they who had the reputation of wisdom, and the rulers and elders, took away from the people every passage which might bring them into discredit among the people. We need not wonder, then, if this history of the evil device of the licentious elders against Susanna is true, but was concealed and removed from the Scriptures by men themselves not very far removed from the counsel of these elders. [...]
    What I have said is, I think, sufficient to prove that it would be nothing wonderful if this history were true, and the licentious and cruel attack was actually made on Susanna by those who were at that time elders, and written down by the wisdom of the Spirit, but removed by these rulers of Sodom, as the Spirit would call them. [...]
~400 AD: Jerome & Augustine in their letters to each other

Jerome, Letter 75: ...In my attempt to translate into Latin, for the benefit of those who speak the same language with myself, the corrected Greek version of the Scriptures, I have labored not to supersede what has been long esteemed, but only to bring prominently forward those things which have been either omitted or tampered with by the Jews, in order that Latin readers might know what is found in the original Hebrew.

Augustine, Letter 82: As to your translation, you have now convinced me of the benefits to be secured by your proposal to translate the Scriptures from the original Hebrew, in order that you may bring to light those things which have been either omitted or perverted by the Jews. But I beg you to be so good as state by what Jews this has been done, whether by those who before the Lord's advent translated the Old Testament--and if so, by what one or more of them--or by the Jews of later times, who may be supposed to have mutilated or corrupted the Greek Mss., in order to prevent themselves from being unable to answer the evidence given by these concerning the Christian faith. I cannot find any reason which should have prompted the earlier Jewish translators to such unfaithfulness. I beg of you, moreover, to send us your translation of the Septuagint, which I did not know that you had published.
~600 AD: Isidore of Seville
As a certain one of those who know has recorded, the Hebrews received this work (Wisdom) among the Canonical Scriptures. But after they had seized and killed the Christ, remembering the most evident testimonies concerning Christ in that same book, in which it is written: ‘The impious said among themselves, ‘let us seize the just,’ etc., taking counsel lest we might lay upon them such an evident sacrilege, they cut it off from the prophetic volumes, and prohibited its reading to their people.
- Isidore of Seville, as quoted by Andrew Edward Breen in his A General and Critical Introduction to the Study of Holy Scripture. Original source not identified.